Antigua

ANTIGUA

Capital: St. John’s, Currency: Eastern Caribbean (EC) Dollar

Antigua and Barbuda is a twin-island country in the Americas, lying between the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. It consists of two major inhabited islands, Antigua and Barbuda, and a number of smaller islands (including Great Bird, Green, Guinea, Long, Maiden and York Islands and further south, the island of Redonda). The permanent population numbers about 81,800 (at the 2011 Census) and the capital and largest port and city is St. John’s, on Antigua.

Separated by a few nautical miles, Antigua and Barbuda are in the middle of the Leeward Islands, part of the Lesser Antilles, roughly at 17°N of the equator. The country’s name was given by Christopher Columbus in 1493 after discovering the island, in honor of the Virgin of La Antigua in the Seville Cathedral. The country is nicknamed “Land of 365 Beaches” due to the many beaches surrounding the islands. Its governance, language, and culture have all been strongly influenced by the British Empire, of which the country was formerly a part.

Geography

Antigua and Barbuda both are generally low-lying islands whose terrain has been influenced more by limestone formations than volcanic activity. The highest point on Antigua is Mount Obama (formerly Boggy Peak), the remnant of a volcanic crater rising 402 metres (1,319 feet).

The shorelines of both islands are greatly indented with beaches, lagoons, and natural harbours. The islands are rimmed by reefs and shoals. There are few streams as rainfall is slight. Both islands lack adequate amounts of fresh groundwater.

Rainfall averages 990 mm (39 in) per year, with the amount varying widely from season to season. In general the wettest period is between September and November. The islands generally experience low humidity and recurrent droughts. Hurricanes strike on an average of once a year. Temperatures average 27 °C (80.6 °F), with a range from 23 °C (73.4 °F) in the winter to 30 °C (86 °F) in the summer and autumn. The coolest period is between December and February. Its low humidity makes it one of the most temperate climates in the world.

Ecology

The sandy soil on much of the islands has only scrub vegetation. Some parts of Antigua are more fertile–most notably the central plain–due to the volcanic ash in the soil. These areas support some tropical vegetation and agricultural uses. The planting of acacia, mahogany, and red and white cedar on Antigua has led to as much as 11% of the land becoming forested, helping to conserve the soil and water.

Languages

English is the official language.The Barbudan accent is slightly different from the Antiguan.

In the years before Antigua and Barbuda’s independence, Standard English was widely spoken in preference to Antiguan Creole. Generally, the upper and middle classes shun Antiguan Creole. The educational system dissuades the use of Antiguan Creole and instruction is done in Standard (British) English.

Many of the words used in the Antiguan dialect are derived from British as well as African languages. This can be easily seen in phrases such as: “Ent it?” meaning “Ain’t it?” which is itself dialectal and means “Isn’t it?”. Common island proverbs can often be traced to Africa.

Spanish is spoken by around 10,000 inhabitants.

Festivals

Further information: List of festivals in Antigua and Barbuda

The national Carnival held each August commemorates the abolition of slavery in the British West Indies, although on some islands, Carnival may celebrate the coming of Lent. Its festive pageants, shows, contests and other activities are a major tourist attraction.

Cuisine

Further information: Antigua and Barbuda cuisine

Corn and sweet potatoes play an important role in Antiguan cuisine. For example, a popular Antiguan dish, Dukuna is a sweet, steamed dumpling made from grated sweet potatoes, flour and spices. One of the Antiguan staple foods, fungi , is a cooked paste made of cornmeal and water.

Find comprehensive information about the country you are visiting including its population to climate.

New Delhi

Name:High Commission of Britain

Address:Shantipath, Chanakyapuri

City:New Delhi – 110 021

Country:India

Telephone:2687 2161 / 2410 0017 (Help-Line), 24100020/ 21/ 22 (Visa Section)

Fax:2687 0060 / 2611 6094

Timings:Mon to Fri

Office Timings:0800 to 1700 hrs

Email:conqry.newdelhi@fco.gov.uk

Notes:This is a British Overseas Territory. Visa is Handled by British High Commission.

Territory Jurisdiction:Same as United Kingdom.

New Delhi

Name:Honorary Consulate General of Antigua & Barbuda in New Delhi

Address:F-4, (3rd Floor), Anand Niketan (Opposite Rao Tula Ram College), Benito Juarez Marg

City:New Delhi- 110021

Country:India

Telephone:09910063953

Notes:This is a British Overseas Territory. Visa is Handled by British High Commission.

Territory Jurisdiction:Same as United Kingdom.

ANTIGUA AND BARBODA ARE COMMONWEALTH COUNTRIES OF UK AND SO NEED TO APPLY THOUGH UK HIGH COMMISSION.

*Note:

Visa Fee Subject to Change.

Although the information on this website has been prepared with utmost care. However, regulations and requirements are subject to change.

Embassy/Consulate reserves the right to ask for additional documents or personal appearance for an interview in special cases. Submission of the above-mentioned documents does not guarantee that a visa is granted. Submission of incomplete documentation or refusal to appear for a special visa interview may result in the rejection of your application.

ANTIGUA AND BARBODA ARE COMMONWEALTH COUNTRIES OF UK AND SO NEED TO APPLY THOUGH UK HIGH COMMISSION.

*Note:

Visa Fee Subject to Change.

Although the information on this website has been prepared with utmost care. However, regulations and requirements are subject to change.

Embassy/Consulate reserves the right to ask for additional documents or personal appearance for an interview in special cases. Submission of the above-mentioned documents does not guarantee that a visa is granted. Submission of incomplete documentation or refusal to appear for a special visa interview may result in the rejection of your application.